Bushbuck - Trogelophus scriptus

• Hedgehog - Atelerix frontalis • Bushbabies - Lorisidae • Greater cane rat - Thryonomys swinderianus • Baboons and Monkeys - Cercopithecidae • Pangolin - Manis temminckii • Antbear - Orycteropus afer • Hares - Leporidae • Squirrels - Sciuridae • Spring Hare - Pedietes capensis • Porcupine - Hystrix africaeausralis • Jackals and Foxes - Canidae • Weasels, Polecats, Badgers and Otters - Mustelidae • Civets, Suricates, Genets and Mongooses - Viveridae • Haenas - Hayenidae • Cats - Felidae • Hyraxes - Procaviidae • Pigs - Suidae • Antelope - Bovidae • Rhinocerus - Rhinocerotidae • Zebras - Equidae • Hippopotamus - Hippopotamus amphibius • Giraffe - Giraffa cameloperdalis • Elephant - Loxodonata africana •


Damara Dik-dik - Madoqua kirkii | Oribi - Ourebia ourebi | Suni - Neotragus moschatus | Grysbok - Raphicerus melanotis | Sharpe's Grysbok - Raphicerus sharpii | Klipspringer - Oreotragus oreotragus | Blue Duiker - Philancomba monticola | Red Duiker - Cepholophus natalensis | Common Duiker - Sylvicapra grimmia | Steenbok - Raphicerus campestris | Bushbuck - Trogelophus scriptus | Blesbok - Damaliscus dorcas phillipsi | Bontebok- Domaliscus dorcas dorcas | Reedbuck - Redunca arundinum | Mountain Reedbuck - Redunca fulvorufula | Grey Rheebuck- Pelea capreolus | Springbuck - Antidorcas marsupialis | Impala - Aepyceros melampus melampus | Blue Wildebeest - Connochaetes taurinus | Black Wildebeest - Connochaetes gnu | Tsessebe - Domaliscus lunatus | Gemsbuck - Oryx gazella | Red Hartebeest - Alcelaphus buselaphus | Lichtenstein's Hartebeest - Sigmoceros lichtensteinii | Sable- Hippotragus niger | Roan - Hippotragus equinus | Puku - Kobus vardonii | Waterbuck - Kobus ellipsiprymnus | Red Lechwe - Kobus leche | Nyala - Tragelaphus angasii | Sitatunga - Tragelaphus spekei | Kudu - Tragelaphus strepsiceros | Eland - Taurotragus oryx | Buffalo - Syncerus caffer

 


Afrikaans Bosbok Zulu Imbabala
Tswana Serolobotlhoko 
Shona
Dsoma Shangaan Mbvala
Photo: National Parks Board
R.W. Min
14" Max 19"
S.C.I Min 31" Max 55" Measurement Method 5

wpe1B.jpg (7662 bytes)


Tracks
4cm

Distribution

Dung
1cm
Clusters of 4cm

Visible Male/Female Differences

Only males bear horns, males larger than females. Females have two pairs of nipples between their hind legs.

Habitat and Distribution

Woodland and forest in dense cover near permanent water. May make short seasonal movements away from permanent water when surface water is temporarily available. 

Diet

A selective browser. Eats leaves and shoots; buds, flowers and fruit. Will take dry fallen leaves in winter. Often feeds at forest edges.

Reproduction

Single young  weighing an average of 4kg are born at any time of year after a gestation of 1 80 days. Lambs stay with their mothers until eight months old. Males are sexually mature at 10-11 months, females at 14 months and males first breed at 4 years when they have risen in the dominance hierarchy. Lifespan 13 years.

Behavior and Habits

Active at night, dawn and dusk and rests during the day in the densest cover. They associate with baboons and monkeys to feed on fruit and leaves dropped from the trees. Home ranges are about 0,5 ha in winter and 6 ha in summer; and larger depending on the area. Males will thrash the soil and bushes with their horns and rub the head and neck on bushes and trees.  They can not run very fast and avoids predators by hiding. They will enter water and are strong swimmers. Fights between males can be fatal and they are very aggressive against predators and human hunters.

Sounds

The alarm call is a loud, very dog-like bark.

Dung and Field sign

Droppings are distinctive tubular clusters of pellets. Clusters are 2-3 cm across. Horned soil and bushes.

 



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